service-sector

System Gallery

about: 

Artist-led volunteer-ran independent art gallery on the second floor of Bar Loco in the heart of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Proud to support early-career and emerging artists in the Northeast by offering exhibition space.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

System Gallery
22-24 Leazes Park Road
NE1 4PG Newcastle Upon Tyne 54° 58' 32.0736" N, 1° 37' 5.0052" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

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established: 

2012

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

sister project(s): 

Invisible

Invisible

about: 

Through its partnership with The People’s Kitchen, the System Gallery will hand-out disposable cameras to people living in Newcastle without homes. Throughout 2017, the participants of the project are encouraged to use the cameras to document their lives and capture everyday moments. A selection of these photographs will then be developed, printed and framed to form an exhibition to be held at the System Gallery in late 2017, this exhibition will then travel throughout several venues in Newcastle.

The aim of INVISIBLE is to help people affected by homelessness to reconnect with the wider society through photography. INVISIBLE seeks to make their lives visible, only shown from their own point of view.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

System Gallery
Leazes Park Terrace
NE1 4PG Newcastle Upon Tyne 54° 58' 32.0736" N, 1° 37' 5.0052" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

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established: 

2017

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

Centrum

about: 

Centrum is a contemporary art space in the Flughafenkiez district of Neukölln, Berlin. Formerly used as a retail store and brothel, Centrum’s exhibition space is not a pure white cube, but owes its specific character to its tiled floor composed of red ceramic and gray stone tiles, and from the large shop window looking out into the street. Artists have in the past on several occasions produced works and installations that were inspired by these characteristics and by the history of the space.
Centrum since 2009 has collaborated with various artists and has developed a series of experimental projects, including a festival of video installations and film screenings, and performances. Some projects were shown outside the exhibition space and in collaboration with other artist-run initiatives.
Centrum offers a platform for the discourses in and around contemporary art as well as the opportunity to meet other artists through artist talks, lectures, and film screenings.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

Situated in the so-called 'Flughafenkiez' (airport neighbourhood), in walking distance to Berlin's former airport Tempelhofer Feld, the space was formerly used as a dog shelter, café, and finally, until 2009, as a bar and brothel. In 2009 the space was refurbished and a large shop window towards the street was installed by Centrum's founding directors, Kate Squires and David Moynihan, before the exhibition space officially opened in 2010.

address: 

Centrum
Reuterstrasse 7
12053 Berlin 52° 28' 55.308" N, 13° 25' 45.984" E
DE

total size in sqm/sqft: 

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number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2009

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

The Russian Club Gallery

The Russian Club Gallery

about: 

The Russian Club (named after the site's previous incarnation as a Russian pool room and bar) was set-up as an art gallery and commercial fashion photography studios in 2008. The gallery was programmed by artist Matt Golden and focussed on pairing artists for exhibitions, as well as a small number of group shows with invited curators. The gallery was funded by the commercial photographic studios and the kind and generous effort of each of the exhibiting artists.

Golden ended the gallery programme in 2012 but has since curated Russian Club exhibitions at Annely Juda Fine Art and artists commissions in Rollacoaster Magazine.

The Russian Club continues to run as commercial photography studios as well as being the artistic base for Matt and Natsue Golden.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

Mechanics workshop / pool rooms and bar

address: 

The Russian Club
Kingsland Road
E8 4DA London 51° 32' 24.3564" N, 0° 4' 34.626" W
GB

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

established: 

2008

vacated: 

2012

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

AirSpace Gallery

about: 

AirSpace Gallery is a collaborative, artist led project in Stoke-on-Trent, providing professional development opportunities, studio and exhibiting space and support for artists. Through a dynamic and evolving programme of exhibitions, events and activities AirSpace Gallery brings critical, high quality contemporary art to the region and provides opportunities for a broad range of artists.

AirSpace Gallery was formed in 2006 by two Staffordshire University fine art undergraduates, David Bethell and Andrew Branscombe. At this point there was no contemporary visual arts provision in Stoke-on-Trent. Since then AirSpace Gallery has remained artist-led and has been programming high quality visual arts activity for and from established and emerging, national and international artists, consisting of exhibitions, residencies and public realm works ,alongside a committed approach to professional artist development.

As an artist-led space, the Gallery's current research interests mirror those of its directors and is particularly concerned with issues surrounding collaboration and partnership working and a relational relevance with its location and the socio-political landscape.

AirSpace has an ongoing series of projects, which are developed through a mixture of open calls and invitation. This makes for an exciting and vibrant mix of exhibitions, residencies, projects, artist development events and public realm works.

AirSpace Gallery has always been and remains committed to Paying Artists.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • unincorporated organisation

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

Built originally as the headquarters of the City's Gas Board in 1874, 4 Broad Street has subsequently, variously, been a bank, a building society,a tax office, a mission of catholic wives suffering domestic abuse and a pensioner's charity.

address: 

AirSpace Gallery
4 Broad street
ST1 4HL Stoke-on-Trent 53° 1' 24.9816" N, 2° 10' 42.2436" W
GB

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of workshops: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

types of workshops: 

established: 

2006

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

The NewBridge Project

about: 

The NewBridge Project supports artists to investigate and challenge the boundaries of contemporary art practice.
The NewBridge Project is an artist-led community comprising of over 80 artist studios, an exhibition space and book shop based in a 29,000sqft former office block in Newcastle city centre.
The NewBridge Project was established in 2010 to provide exchange and support in an engaged and discursive community of artists. The shared workspace is a critical and collaborative environment that allows artists to discuss and develop new ideas and projects.
The NewBridge Project Space provides artists with the opportunity to exhibit in a supportive space that promotes an experimental and critical approach to practice. The exhibition space is dedicated to exploring new and diverse contemporary art practice through a programme of regular exhibitions, screenings and events, supported by responsive talks, publications and broadcasts.
The NewBridge Project continues to develop in response to the needs and interests of its members.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • community interest company

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

Norham House
12-18 New Bridge Street West
NE1 8AW Newcastle upon Tyne , TWR 54° 58' 27.7932" N, 1° 36' 38.7072" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

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types of studios: 

  • open plan, private

types of workshops: 

established: 

2010

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

RAUMX LOndon

RAUMX- London

about: 

From mid 2013 Martina Geccelli has set up this art and architecture project space within her own studio in Kentish Town, London.

Part of the concept is that selected artists, or architects can introduce their work to a smaller, interested audience . RAUMX provides an open, intimate platform, outside of the commercial setting of a gallery. Beside presenting work to the public the space offers opportunities for an active exchange in form of talks and discussions and more intimate gatherings.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

London Kentish Town
185 Queens Crescent
NW5 4DS London 51° 33' 2.6604" N, 0° 9' 0.7956" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2013

vacated: 

2013

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

The Woodmill GP

The Woodmill GP (photo: Michael Heilgemeir)

about: 

"(...) The first part of this organisation’s name comes from its previous location – the Woodmill building, rundown former council offices in Bermondsey, southeast London, that, from 2009 to 2011, was home to a hundred artists, designers and filmmakers. (...)

During a short period of itinerancy, enforced by the end of the tenancy, the six original studio holders – Naomi Pearce, Stuart Middleton, Anna Baker, Angharad E. P. Williams, Richard Sides and Alastair Frazer – in liaison with their newly founded board of trustees spent many hours working out what the Woodmill should be (as well as searching for a new location – no former primary school, warehouse or empty retail unit was left unturned). The upshot of this was a decision to build the idea of constant flux into the organisation’s character. This resolution was not just a pragmatic one, but also one that resonated with the Woodmill’s desire for perpetual reinvention, for avoiding its own establishment and for eschewing any desire to become an institution with permanent footings. Happily ensconced, for now, in a former doctor’s surgery (which supplies the ‘GP’ part of the new name: ‘general practice’) – in which the old waiting room doubles as a shared studio and temporary exhibition and screening space (dinners, gigs and workshops are on the cards), with each of the doctor’s offices becoming private work digs, including a gratis residency studio – the Woodmill will move on again after one year. And it will voluntarily repeat this annual migration for the foreseeable future. Each time it moves, the Woodmill will evolve: it may become more popular; it will engage with more people; it may get written about more; the gallery footfall may increase; the space it occupies may be larger; it may move somewhere smaller. But by the nature of its instability, it won’t put down roots. It won’t be forced into an upward trajectory. Which, in a world dominated by the socioeconomic buzzwords of ‘growth’ and ‘development’, where artists are categorised as failures if they don’t move from the ‘emerging’ label to ‘midcareer’ or ‘established’, is a pretty grand ideal."

Oliver Basciano (2012), "Off-Space no 9: The Woodmill, London - Entering the Establishment"
online available at: http://artreview.com/features/off_space_no_9_woodmill_london/
(accessed 13 Sep 2013)

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

Local GP Surgery

exhibitions, events, workshops: 

'Medulla Oblongata' - Ilja Karilampi (commission)
11.2013- 02.2014

'Boiled Angel' - 18.10.13 - 08.12.13
Artists: Michael Bell-Smith, Max Maslansky, Louise Sartor, Ariana Reines, Mike Diana

'Wendel! Open Your Door', @ Cafe Gallery Projects + Southwark Park, 06.07.2013 – 28.07.2013
artists: Sol Archer, Anna Bunting-Branch, Cindie Cheung, Will Cenci, Beth Collar, Annie Davey, Chris Fite-Wassilak, Alastair Frazer, Patrick Goddard, Anna Gritz, Charmian Griffin, Dean Kenning, Una Knox, Lawrence Leaman, Daniel Lichtman, Will May-Robinson, Stuart Middleton, Laura Oldfield Ford, Naomi Pearce, Sam Porritt, Richard Sides, Frances Scott, Christopher M. Smith, Jennifer Teets, Simon Werner, Angharad E.P Williams

'Robert Crosse: Home Advantage', Screening @ Millwall FC, The Den: 27.04.2013

'Residency #4: Martin Groß', Exhibition + Screening: 11.06.2013
artists: Martin Groß + Emily Richardson with Jonathan P Watts

'Residency #3: Daniel Lichtman / Public Access Television Within a World Systems Pattern of Understanding', Lecture event @ City Business Centre: 27.02.13

'Residency #2: Beth Collar - Ancient Britain', 14.11.2012 – 14.12.2012

'Dickens Dinner': 08.12.2012
Dinner time event by The Woodmill with invited contributions: Lucy Beech & Edward Thomasson, Ben Burgis, Adam Christensen, Beth Collar, Dave Green, Rafael Hefti

'Nobody Ordered Wolves - Screening Series', 22.10.2012 – 03.12.2012

'General Practice', 06.10.2012 – 14.10.2012
artists: Anna Baker, Cindie Cheung, Ben Connors, Annie Davey, Renaud Jerez, Michael Robert Johnstone, Una Knox, Stuart Middleton, Frances Scott, Richard Sides, Simon Werner, Angharad E P Williams and invited guests.

address: 

6-8 Drummond Road Bermondsey
SE16 4BU London 51° 29' 51.6552" N, 0° 3' 43.344" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • open plan, private

types of workshops: 

established: 

2012

vacated: 

2014

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

direct follow-up/precursory project(s): 

City Racing

City Racing - The Life and Times of an Artist-Run Gallery, London: Black Dog Publishing (book cover)

about: 

City Racing was an artist-run space in Kennington, South London which was active between 1988 and 1998. It was a cooperative by five artists Matt Hale, Paul Noble, John Burgess, Keith Coventry and Peter Owen. They set up the gallery in a former betting shop near the Oval cricket ground, hence the derivation of the gallery name. City Racing became an important and renowned exhibition space; its openings provided a networking opportunity for many artists.

In its later years, City Racing was accepted to some extent by the art establishment, and was viewed by some as a route for artists to other more commercial and established galleries. It was featured in Time Out and City Limits as part of a new alternative art scene happening in London. This led to a benefit for the gallery organised by Karsten Schubert. David Burrows wrote that "in one sense, City Racing refused to be marginalised from the mainstream and had conventional career aspirations.
[source: Wikipedia.org]

City Racing acted as both a social and cultural barometer, charting the various shifts in British art throughout the 1990's. Its legacy provides a useful counterpoint to the widely mediated myth of the 'YBA'. City Racing both prioritised and privileged artists' intentions, giving crucial support and exposure at an early stage in the careers of many artists who would later achieve both national and international acclaim.
[source: undo.net]

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • co-operative

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

bookmaker / bookie / betting shop

exhibitions, events, workshops: 

City Racing featured exhibitions by many artists who went on to find fame including Sarah Lucas, Fiona Banner, Ceal Floyer, Gillian Wearing and Martin Creed. In 2001 the artists were re-united in a retrospective of the gallery at the ICA.

bibliography: 

Burgess, J.; Coventry, K.; Hale, M.; Noble, P.; Owen P. (2002), City Racing: The Life and Times of an Artist-Run Gallery, London: Black Dog Publishing

address: 

Kennington Oval
SE11 5SS London 51° 28' 58.1556" N, 0° 6' 54.6696" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

established: 

1988

vacated: 

1998

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

The Woodmill

Thom O`Nions at Woodmill, Neckinger - from: Heilgemeir, M. (2013), The Nomadic Studio, Stuttgart: Edition Taube (photo: Michael Heilgemeir)

about: 

The Woodmill was initiated by a group of artists and Southwark Council’s Regeneration department, with support from ACAVA, and occupied a series of ex–council buildings, including a 40,000 sqft office block, an industrial hangar space built in 1901, as well as a set of residential flats inhabited by 20 of the 100 studio artists, from 2009 – 2011.

Over the course of 18 months the Woodmill hosted 14 main public exhibitions, 33 events and some 40 project exhibitions created by studio artists. More than 150 artists from 15 countries were invited to realise projects that were seen by over 6,000 visitors.

In October 2012 The Woodmill relocated to nearby Drummond Road, Bermondsey SE16 and re-opened as 'The Woodmill GP'

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • unincorporated organisation

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

"... Previously the site of a large tannery, the (Neckinger) Depot’s infamous ‘sharp stink’ of Bermondsey’s other prolific industry was replaced in the early 20th Century with civic buildings and storage. By 2009, the Woodmill; a 40,000 sq ft tin can with inadequate utility systems and outdated interior design had become economically and environmentally inefficient to its owners. Although generally in sound condition, the Woodmill neither reflected the newly engineered Tooley Street offices of Southwark Council’s aspiration, nor did it belong to the identity of the Borough’s future. In worse condition, the rest of the Depot’s surrounding hangar buildings built in 1901 and previously used as a wheel wrights and bus depot, stood rotting slowly; graveyards for obsolete computer equipment, rusty office fans and mouldy lever arch files..."

from: Naomi Pearce (2010) "A Fast Event, A Slow Event", printed in Art Licks Issue 2

exhibitions, events, workshops: 

'The Woodmill S.A.G.S.', 09.04.2011 – 01.05.2011
'The Present Archive', 18.03.2011 – 27.03.2011
'Perverted Minimalism Nr. 3', 18.03.2011 – 27.03.2011
'Elephants at the Woodmill (Nicolas Party)', 11.02.2011 – 27.02.2011
'Bad History (Neil Clements)', 14.01.2011 – 13.02.2011
'Coherence & Proximity (Mark Fell)', 03.12.2010 – 19.12.2010
'Pale Blue Dot', 03.12.2010 – 19.12.2010
'Bergan Biennale II: The Next Generation', 19.11.2010 – 21.11.2010
'Man in the Dark', 08.10.2010 – 07.11.2010
'Buzz or Howl', 10.09.2010 – 26.09.2010
'Reading a Wave', 23.06.2010 – 25.07.2010
'Lucky Dip', 23.06.2010 – 18.07.2010
'Elena Bajo', 21.04.2010 – 23.05.2010
'The Devil's Necktie', 12.02.2010 – 07.03.2010

for further information see: www.woodmill.org/exhibitions

bibliography: 

Heilgemeir, M. (2013), The Nomadic Studio - Art, Life and the Colonisation of Meanwhile Space, Stuttgart: Edition Taube (ISBN: 978-3-9814518-2-5)

address: 

The Woodmill - Neckinger Depot
Neckinger
SE16 3QN London 51° 29' 47.076" N, 0° 4' 29.8812" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of workshops: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

types of workshops: 

established: 

2009

vacated: 

2011

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

direct follow-up/precursory project(s): 

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