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Cubitt

Cubitt Gallery and Studios

about: 

Cubitt is an artist-run gallery and studio provider based in Islington. We are an independent organisation managed by our members: a community of over 30 artists dedicated to nurturing and supporting emerging practice in the visual arts. Over twenty years we have grown as unique hub for international developments in contemporary visual culture: providing essential opportunities for artists and curators to expand their practice critically at an early stage in their careers; whilst enriching the lives of countless audience members and thousands of local people through meaningful and responsive engagement. With the creative freedom and community of the studio at its heart, Cubitt is a multi-layered; richly resourced yet incredibly cost-effective; democratic beacon for outstanding art.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

8 Angel Mews
N1 9HH London 51° 31' 56.0496" N, 0° 6' 27.2628" W
GB

usage: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

1995

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

S1 Artspace

about: 

S1 Artspace is an artist-led organisation presenting an annual programme of contemporary exhibitions, commissions, screenings and events. S1 also provides studio space for contemporary artists at varying stages in their careers, from recent graduates to established artists working at an international level.

Founded in 1995 by a group of Sheffield-based artists seeking to create a sustainable studio environment in Sheffield City Centre, S1 Artspace has become a nationally recognised organisation, renowned for providing a platform for experimentation and for supporting the development of new work in a wide variety of media through artists’ residencies, commissions, and an annual studio holders’ exhibition. Over its sixteen year history, S1 Artspace has presented work by over 300 artists and accommodated over 100 artists.

In 2010, S1 Artspace moved to new larger premises to support a growing commitment to its international exhibition programme.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

120 Trafalgar Street
S1 4JT Sheffield 53° 22' 40.4328" N, 1° 28' 32.0124" W
GB

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

1995

last known status of the project: 

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Outpost

about: 

OUTPOST is an artist run gallery based in Norwich committed to the uncompromising presentation of contemporary art. A core programme of 11 exhibitions per year, each opening on the 1st of the month, 6 - 9pm and run from the 2nd to 21st of the month, 12 - 6pm (no exhibition in January). A programme of events and offsite projects runs alongside.

A membership scheme is operated and is vital to OUTPOST’s activity. Artist Members are encouraged to submit material to the Members Archive; a source from which exhibitions can be selected and independent curators can use as a resource. Membership costs £15 per year, a days invigilation can be provided in lieu of payment. Membership support for OUTPOST is invaluable, extending beyond the financial and ensuring that a credible context for contemporary art in Norwich is recognised and sustained. A committee of up to 8 members run the gallery with a limit of two years service each to ensure that selection and organisational processes remain fresh. OUTPOST was founded in November 2004 with financial support form Arts Council England East, Norfolk County Council, Norwich City Council and Norwich Gallery.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

10b Wensum Street
NR3 1HR Norwich , NFK 52° 37' 54.6204" N, 1° 17' 53.0448" E
GB

usage: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2004

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

The Royal Standard

about: 

Through a dynamic and challenging gallery programme that brings together local, national and international artists, we aim to showcase the most exciting, innovative exhibitions and events that we can, working with the most outstanding recent graduates and emerging artists as well as more established practitioners and other artist-led initiatives.

The Royal Standard is dedicated to promoting exchange, dialogue and experimentation, providing a supportive and critically engaged environment to work in, and acting as a social hub for our studio membership of over 40 artists, as well as the wider cultural community. Our multi-purpose project space offers a testing ground for artists to push their ideas in new directions, and a setting for more spontaneous events and activity happening independently to the main gallery programme.

The Royal Standard was established in 2006 by four Liverpool-based artists in response to the need for a new artist-led organisation that would operate somewhere in between the city’s grass-roots DIY initiatives and the more established arts institutions. Originally housed in a former pub in Toxteth, in 2008 The Royal Standard undertook an ambitious relocation and expansion into a larger industrial space on the Northern periphery of the city centre, relaunching to acclaim for the 2008 Liverpool Biennial.

The Royal Standard is currently run by a team of four to six directors, with a new team appointed on a two-year rolling basis, enabling the organisation’s ideas and energy to remain fresh and continuing to offer opportunities to new groups of emerging artists.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

131 Vauxhall Road Unit 3, Vauxhall Business Centre
L3 6BN Liverpool 53° 24' 51.858" N, 2° 59' 24" W
GB

usage: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2006

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

The Lombard Method

about: 

The Lombard Method is an artist-led studio and project space in Birmingham inaugurated in 2009. The Lombard Method aims to develop the individual practices of its members through critical dialogue, group interaction, and engagement with a programme of residencies, exhibitions and events held in our project spaces.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

68a Lombard Street
B12 0QR Birmingham 52° 28' 18.2784" N, 1° 53' 10.6368" W
GB

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2009

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

Grand Union

about: 

Grand Union is a gallery and studios located in Digbeth, Birmingham’s cultural quarter.

We support the development of artists and curators through the provision of high quality workspaces and an ambitious programme of free exhibitions, talks and events.

Run by a small group of artists and curators, Grand Union is part of a growing artistic community with the production of new art and ideas at its heart.

Founders:
Helen Brown, Ian England, Joanna Essen, Mark Essen, Reuben Henry, Cheryl Jones, Harminder Judge, Karin Kihlberg, Feng-Ru Lee, Charlie Levine,
Alexandra Lockett, David Miller, David Thomas, Matt Westbrook, Stuart Whipps

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • community interest company

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

Minerva Works
158 Fazeley St
B5 5RS Birmingham 52° 28' 44.7456" N, 1° 52' 58.5516" W
GB

usage: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2010

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

Meter Room

about: 

Founded in February 2011, Meter Room is a not-for-profit artist-run organisation located in ‘void’ City Council offices in the centre of Coventry.

Meter Room comprises of a 1400 square feet project space and 7 adjoining low-cost artist studios that are centrally located, secure, and provide 24 hour access.

Meter Room is dedicated to supporting the creation of new experimental work by artists and curators through a series of residencies and projects that respond to its function as a site of art production and dissemination.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

58-64 Corporation Street
CV11GF Coventry 52° 24' 34.7004" N, 1° 30' 47.2068" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

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types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2011

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Moot

about: 

da da

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

1 Thoresby Street
NG1 1AJ Nottingham 52° 57' 2.8836" N, 1° 8' 8.952" W
GB

usage: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

established: 

2005

vacated: 

2010

last known status of the project: 

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The Woodmill GP

The Woodmill GP (photo: Michael Heilgemeir)

about: 

"(...) The first part of this organisation’s name comes from its previous location – the Woodmill building, rundown former council offices in Bermondsey, southeast London, that, from 2009 to 2011, was home to a hundred artists, designers and filmmakers. (...)

During a short period of itinerancy, enforced by the end of the tenancy, the six original studio holders – Naomi Pearce, Stuart Middleton, Anna Baker, Angharad E. P. Williams, Richard Sides and Alastair Frazer – in liaison with their newly founded board of trustees spent many hours working out what the Woodmill should be (as well as searching for a new location – no former primary school, warehouse or empty retail unit was left unturned). The upshot of this was a decision to build the idea of constant flux into the organisation’s character. This resolution was not just a pragmatic one, but also one that resonated with the Woodmill’s desire for perpetual reinvention, for avoiding its own establishment and for eschewing any desire to become an institution with permanent footings. Happily ensconced, for now, in a former doctor’s surgery (which supplies the ‘GP’ part of the new name: ‘general practice’) – in which the old waiting room doubles as a shared studio and temporary exhibition and screening space (dinners, gigs and workshops are on the cards), with each of the doctor’s offices becoming private work digs, including a gratis residency studio – the Woodmill will move on again after one year. And it will voluntarily repeat this annual migration for the foreseeable future. Each time it moves, the Woodmill will evolve: it may become more popular; it will engage with more people; it may get written about more; the gallery footfall may increase; the space it occupies may be larger; it may move somewhere smaller. But by the nature of its instability, it won’t put down roots. It won’t be forced into an upward trajectory. Which, in a world dominated by the socioeconomic buzzwords of ‘growth’ and ‘development’, where artists are categorised as failures if they don’t move from the ‘emerging’ label to ‘midcareer’ or ‘established’, is a pretty grand ideal."

Oliver Basciano (2012), "Off-Space no 9: The Woodmill, London - Entering the Establishment"
online available at: http://artreview.com/features/off_space_no_9_woodmill_london/
(accessed 13 Sep 2013)

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

Local GP Surgery

exhibitions, events, workshops: 

'Medulla Oblongata' - Ilja Karilampi (commission)
11.2013- 02.2014

'Boiled Angel' - 18.10.13 - 08.12.13
Artists: Michael Bell-Smith, Max Maslansky, Louise Sartor, Ariana Reines, Mike Diana

'Wendel! Open Your Door', @ Cafe Gallery Projects + Southwark Park, 06.07.2013 – 28.07.2013
artists: Sol Archer, Anna Bunting-Branch, Cindie Cheung, Will Cenci, Beth Collar, Annie Davey, Chris Fite-Wassilak, Alastair Frazer, Patrick Goddard, Anna Gritz, Charmian Griffin, Dean Kenning, Una Knox, Lawrence Leaman, Daniel Lichtman, Will May-Robinson, Stuart Middleton, Laura Oldfield Ford, Naomi Pearce, Sam Porritt, Richard Sides, Frances Scott, Christopher M. Smith, Jennifer Teets, Simon Werner, Angharad E.P Williams

'Robert Crosse: Home Advantage', Screening @ Millwall FC, The Den: 27.04.2013

'Residency #4: Martin Groß', Exhibition + Screening: 11.06.2013
artists: Martin Groß + Emily Richardson with Jonathan P Watts

'Residency #3: Daniel Lichtman / Public Access Television Within a World Systems Pattern of Understanding', Lecture event @ City Business Centre: 27.02.13

'Residency #2: Beth Collar - Ancient Britain', 14.11.2012 – 14.12.2012

'Dickens Dinner': 08.12.2012
Dinner time event by The Woodmill with invited contributions: Lucy Beech & Edward Thomasson, Ben Burgis, Adam Christensen, Beth Collar, Dave Green, Rafael Hefti

'Nobody Ordered Wolves - Screening Series', 22.10.2012 – 03.12.2012

'General Practice', 06.10.2012 – 14.10.2012
artists: Anna Baker, Cindie Cheung, Ben Connors, Annie Davey, Renaud Jerez, Michael Robert Johnstone, Una Knox, Stuart Middleton, Frances Scott, Richard Sides, Simon Werner, Angharad E P Williams and invited guests.

address: 

6-8 Drummond Road Bermondsey
SE16 4BU London 51° 29' 51.6552" N, 0° 3' 43.344" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • open plan, private

types of workshops: 

established: 

2012

vacated: 

2014

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

direct follow-up/precursory project(s): 

Transmission Gallery

about: 

A diverse and increasingly high profile art scene has emerged in Glasgow with Transmission at its centre. Transmission provides a place where artists can meet, talk and exhibit along with local and international peers and influences.

Transmission was set up in 1983 by graduates from Glasgow School of Art who were dissatisfied with the lack of exhibition spaces and opportunities for young artists in Glasgow. Through sponsorship and support from the Scottish Arts Council (now Creative Scotland) they managed and maintained a space in which to exhibit their work and the work of a rapidly growing collective of local artists.

They began to invite artists who had influenced them to show in the gallery and become part of this dialogue. The range of contacts grew through projects with similar organisations such as City Racing in London and Artemisia in Chicago and this exchange of ideas has continued with Transmission providing a model for other collectives like Catalyst in Belfast and Generator in Dundee.

The gallery is managed by a voluntary committee of six people. Each member of the committee serves for up to two years and is then replaced. Transmission evolves under the influence of each successive committee member and continues to draw in a young peer group as active participants. The regular changes in the gallery's committee maintain a fluid and varied relationship with developing concerns in the world of the visual arts. The broad perspectives on contemporary culture offered by the individuals involved ensure Transmission's prominent role in these discourses and the gallery is committed to keeping its engagement challenging and current.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

exhibitions, events, workshops: 

see www.transmissiongallery.org/archive for a complete list of exhibitions from 1983 until today

additional information: 

Membership: Key to the support and running of the gallery is its membership body. Anyone may become a member of the gallery for a nominal fee that can instead, if preferred, be paid in kind by invigilating an exhibition (if locally based). Members receive a regular newsletter to keep them abreast of gallery activities and upcoming shows and are entitled to submit work to the annual members' exhibition. Members are also invited to submit work for inclusion in the gallery archive which is available for view by visiting curators and researchers. Committee Members since 1983: Alistair Magee, Lesley Raeside, John Rogan, Michelle Baucke, Alistair Strachan (first committee) Gordon Muir, Malcolm Dickson, Carl Rhodes, Graham Johnstone, Peter Thompson, Simon Brown, Douglas Aubrey (second committee) Richard Walker, Jayne Taylor, Tommy Lydon, John Main, Billy Clark, Karen Strang, Gillian Steel, Scott Paterson, Anne Elliot, David Allen, Christine Borland, Mike Ellen, Peter Gilmour, Euan Sutherland, Anne Vance, Douglas Gordon, Craig Richardson, Claire Barclay, Elsie Mitchell, Roderick Buchanan, Katrina Brown, Jacqueline Donachie, Martin Boyce, Simon Starling, Kirsty Ogg, Eva Rothschild, Will Bradley, Toby Webster, Tanya Leighton, Judith Weik, Caoline Kirsop, Toby Paterson, Sarah Tripp, Robert Johnston, Ewan Imrie, Julian Kildear, Lucy Skaer, Sophie Macpherson, Rose Thomas, Alan Michael, Fred Pedersen, Anna MacLauchlan, Danny Saunders, Alex Pollard, Clare Stephenson, Lorna Macintyre, Laurence Figgis, Kate Davis, Gregor Wright, Jane Topping, Nick Evans, Charlie Hammond, Lotte Gertz, Lynn Hynd, Lucy MacEachan, Iain Hetherington, Michael Stumpf, Michael Hill Johnston, Cara Tolmie, Laura Aldridge, Giles Bailey, Tim Facey, Victoria Skogsberg, Conal McStravick, Helen Tubridy, Levi Hanes, Jens Strandberg, Salomeh Grace, Sophie Mackfall, Rebecca Wilcox, Tom Varley, Mark Briggs, Amelia Bywater, Carrie Skinner, Claire Shallcross, and Chris Dyson. This is a list of everyone who has served as a Transmission committee member from 1983 to the present. The second committee entirely replaced the first but after that the groupings are less defined. Some people stayed for the standard two years (occasionally more), others left after a few months. At times there were only two people on the committee, the standard is now six. Your current committee is Darren Rhymes, Emilia Muller-Ginorio, Kari Robertson, Hannes Hellström, John Nicol and Ashanti Harris. - accessed in Sept 2013 -

bibliography: 

Transmission Gallery (2001), Transmission - Committee for the Visual Arts, London: Black Dog Publishing (ISBN10: 1 901033 13 9, ISBN13: 978 1 901033 13 7)
see www.transmissiongallery.org/publications/index for a complete list of publications

address: 

28 King Street
G1 5QP Glasgow 55° 51' 24.6348" N, 4° 14' 48.5952" W
GB

usage: 

number of workshops: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of workshops: 

established: 

1983

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

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