industrial

Aid & Abet

Aid & Abet Gallery, Cambridge

about: 

Aid & Abet is an artist-led contemporary art space which supports artists to experiment, take risks and innovate as well as collaborate, engage and network.
Situated close to Cambridge Station in a former railway workshop, Aid & Abet is a production and presentation site for contemporary art that combines work, project, gallery and performance space allowing audiences and participants to engage with cross-disciplinary practices in both creative and critical ways.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

Station Road
CB1 2TZ Cambridge 52° 11' 41.2872" N, 0° 8' 14.2296" E
GB

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • open plan

established: 

2011

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

S1 Artspace

about: 

S1 Artspace is an artist-led organisation presenting an annual programme of contemporary exhibitions, commissions, screenings and events. S1 also provides studio space for contemporary artists at varying stages in their careers, from recent graduates to established artists working at an international level.

Founded in 1995 by a group of Sheffield-based artists seeking to create a sustainable studio environment in Sheffield City Centre, S1 Artspace has become a nationally recognised organisation, renowned for providing a platform for experimentation and for supporting the development of new work in a wide variety of media through artists’ residencies, commissions, and an annual studio holders’ exhibition. Over its sixteen year history, S1 Artspace has presented work by over 300 artists and accommodated over 100 artists.

In 2010, S1 Artspace moved to new larger premises to support a growing commitment to its international exhibition programme.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

120 Trafalgar Street
S1 4JT Sheffield 53° 22' 40.4328" N, 1° 28' 32.0124" W
GB

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

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number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

1995

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

The Lombard Method

about: 

The Lombard Method is an artist-led studio and project space in Birmingham inaugurated in 2009. The Lombard Method aims to develop the individual practices of its members through critical dialogue, group interaction, and engagement with a programme of residencies, exhibitions and events held in our project spaces.

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  • other

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address: 

68a Lombard Street
B12 0QR Birmingham 52° 28' 18.2784" N, 1° 53' 10.6368" W
GB

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previous usage of the site: 

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number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2009

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last known status of the site: 

Space: I Site

Space Leaflet 1973

about: 

In 1968 the artists Bridget Riley and Peter Sedgley, in search of suitable studio spaces for themselves, seized an opportunity to occupy the ‘Ivory Warehouse’ (known as the ‘I’ Site) in St Katharine Dock, near Tower Bridge, E1. (St Katharine Dock had then been taken over from The Port of London Authority by the Greater London Council.)

In need of support, Riley and Sedgely invited a number of enthusiastic people from diverse backgrounds to create a body of Trustees who all had an active interest in the arts: Tony West, Professor of Law at the University of Reading’s Faculty of Urban & Regional Studies; Irene Worth, an actress, ‘passionately’ interested in the arts; Maurice de Sausmarez, Principal of the Byam Shaw School of Art and Peter Townsend, editor of Studio International. After some initial investigations at the Ministry of Housing and Local Government Professor West had deduced that no provision had been made for artists' studios in London describing this as a paradox: ‘...London is, in a way, the centre of the art world but the artists just cannot find a space to work. We want artists, we need them but, they are left to find their own solution...

The enthusiastic group formed ‘Space Provision, Artistic, Cultural and Educational Ltd., S.P.A.C.E. Ltd'. (abbreviated to S.P.A.C.E.) which was non-profit making. It successfully negotiated a two year lease at low rental for the ‘I’ Site from the GLC.
A friend and supporter of the project, Sir Henry Moore, recalls visiting the site with Riley to assess its suitability as a conducive space for artists to work in: 'The building I was taken into had been derelict since the last war. It had a remarkably, romantic feeling about it.’ Archer suggests that '...the range of this support indicates that the venture was, from the very first, identified as a good thing not only within the narrow confines of the art world, but also for the cultural and economic well-being of the community at large'.

from: 'Artists in East London'
online available at: www.acme.org.uk/download.php?pdf=149
(accessed September 2013)

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

St Katharine Docks, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, were one of the commercial docks serving London, on the north side of the river Thames just east (downstream) of the Tower of London and Tower Bridge. They were part of the Port of London, in the area now known as the Docklands, and are now a popular housing and leisure complex.

St Katharine Docks took their name from the former hospital of St Katharine's by the Tower, built in the 12th century, which stood on the site. An intensely built-up 23 acre (9.5 hectares) site was earmarked for redevelopment by an Act of Parliament in 1825, with construction commencing in May 1827. Some 1250 houses were demolished, together with the medieval hospital of St. Katharine. Around 11,300 inhabitants, mostly port workers crammed into insanitary slums, lost their homes; only property owners received compensation. (...)

The docks were officially opened on 25 October 1828. Although well used, they were not a great commercial success and were unable to accommodate large ships. (...)
The St Katharine Docks were badly damaged by German bombing during the Second World War and never fully recovered thereafter. (...)

Most of the original warehouses were demolished and replaced by modern commercial buildings in the early 1970s, with the docks themselves becoming a marina. The development has often been cited as a model example of successful urban redevelopment. (...)

The area now features offices, public and private housing, a large hotel, shops and restaurants, a pub (The Dickens Inn, a former brewery dating back to the 18th century), a yachting marina and other recreational facilities. (...)

from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Katharine_Docks

address: 

Ivory Warehouse, St. Katherine Docks
50 Saint Katharine's Way
E1W 1LA London 51° 30' 23.4612" N, 0° 4' 18.678" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

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types of studios: 

  • open plan, private

established: 

1968

vacated: 

1970

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

Butler's Wharf

Fire at Butler's Wharf, 1979 (photo: Fran Cottell)

about: 

Butler's Wharf was a former riverside warehouse dating from the late 19th century, within the complex of streets and buildings immediately south and east of Tower Bridge.

In the early 1970's many of the buildings in that area had been cheaply purchased by property speculators with a view to re-development. In London at that time, many housing associations and cooperatives were being formed to negotiate cheap rents for derelict properties in the interim period before demolition or redevelopment took place. Many artists lived
and worked under these kinds of arrangements, and it was a group of friends who had met while at art college in the Isle of Man and Brighton who together rented a floor of Block 2B, Butlers Wharf in late 1975, later joined by recent art graduates from Newcastle, Leeds and Maidstone.

From 1975-78, the artists' space at 2B Butler's Wharf was a key venue for early UK video art and performance art, used among others by Derek Jarman and the artists and dancers who subsequently founded Chisenhale Studios and Chisenhale Dance Space, including Philip Jeck.

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  • other

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history of the site: 

Butler's Wharf was built between 1871-73 as a shipping wharf and warehouse complex, to store tea, spices and other imported goods unloaded from ships using the port of London. It contained one of the largest tea warehouse in the world. In 1971, following the relocation of the docks further east and the rise of containerisation, Butler's Wharf and other warehouses in the area fell into disuse.

From 1984, Butler's Wharf has been redeveloped by Conran Roche into luxury flats, with restaurants and shops on the ground floor.
Butler's Wharf is Grade II listed.

exhibitions, events, workshops: 

Exhibitions and events at 2B Butler's Wharf:
The first person to put on a publicized live performance at 2B was Kevin Atherton in November 1975.
In May 1976, regular Saturday evening shows began with presentations by members of the original group, quickly extended to shows by close associates and then opened to all artists wishing to use the space for presentations of their time-based work. In eighty shows over two and a half years, thirty involved film projection, a dozen used video, a further dozen were sound pieces; several used light as a primary element, some were pure performance art, while many used combinations of different media.
By May 1978 when the building was closed down by the developers, there had been over 80 shows by more than 60 artists.
online available at: http://www.studycollection.co.uk/2B/events.html
(accessed September 2013)

bibliography: 

Critical Writing in Art & Design (2013), After Butler's Wharf: Essays on a Working Building, London: Royal College of Art (ISBN: 978-1-907342-71-4)

address: 

Shad Thames
SE1 London 51° 30' 13.23" N, 0° 4' 24.7476" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

1971

vacated: 

1980

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

The Woodmill

Thom O`Nions at Woodmill, Neckinger - from: Heilgemeir, M. (2013), The Nomadic Studio, Stuttgart: Edition Taube (photo: Michael Heilgemeir)

about: 

The Woodmill was initiated by a group of artists and Southwark Council’s Regeneration department, with support from ACAVA, and occupied a series of ex–council buildings, including a 40,000 sqft office block, an industrial hangar space built in 1901, as well as a set of residential flats inhabited by 20 of the 100 studio artists, from 2009 – 2011.

Over the course of 18 months the Woodmill hosted 14 main public exhibitions, 33 events and some 40 project exhibitions created by studio artists. More than 150 artists from 15 countries were invited to realise projects that were seen by over 6,000 visitors.

In October 2012 The Woodmill relocated to nearby Drummond Road, Bermondsey SE16 and re-opened as 'The Woodmill GP'

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • unincorporated organisation

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

"... Previously the site of a large tannery, the (Neckinger) Depot’s infamous ‘sharp stink’ of Bermondsey’s other prolific industry was replaced in the early 20th Century with civic buildings and storage. By 2009, the Woodmill; a 40,000 sq ft tin can with inadequate utility systems and outdated interior design had become economically and environmentally inefficient to its owners. Although generally in sound condition, the Woodmill neither reflected the newly engineered Tooley Street offices of Southwark Council’s aspiration, nor did it belong to the identity of the Borough’s future. In worse condition, the rest of the Depot’s surrounding hangar buildings built in 1901 and previously used as a wheel wrights and bus depot, stood rotting slowly; graveyards for obsolete computer equipment, rusty office fans and mouldy lever arch files..."

from: Naomi Pearce (2010) "A Fast Event, A Slow Event", printed in Art Licks Issue 2

exhibitions, events, workshops: 

'The Woodmill S.A.G.S.', 09.04.2011 – 01.05.2011
'The Present Archive', 18.03.2011 – 27.03.2011
'Perverted Minimalism Nr. 3', 18.03.2011 – 27.03.2011
'Elephants at the Woodmill (Nicolas Party)', 11.02.2011 – 27.02.2011
'Bad History (Neil Clements)', 14.01.2011 – 13.02.2011
'Coherence & Proximity (Mark Fell)', 03.12.2010 – 19.12.2010
'Pale Blue Dot', 03.12.2010 – 19.12.2010
'Bergan Biennale II: The Next Generation', 19.11.2010 – 21.11.2010
'Man in the Dark', 08.10.2010 – 07.11.2010
'Buzz or Howl', 10.09.2010 – 26.09.2010
'Reading a Wave', 23.06.2010 – 25.07.2010
'Lucky Dip', 23.06.2010 – 18.07.2010
'Elena Bajo', 21.04.2010 – 23.05.2010
'The Devil's Necktie', 12.02.2010 – 07.03.2010

for further information see: www.woodmill.org/exhibitions

bibliography: 

Heilgemeir, M. (2013), The Nomadic Studio - Art, Life and the Colonisation of Meanwhile Space, Stuttgart: Edition Taube (ISBN: 978-3-9814518-2-5)

address: 

The Woodmill - Neckinger Depot
Neckinger
SE16 3QN London 51° 29' 47.076" N, 0° 4' 29.8812" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of workshops: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

types of workshops: 

established: 

2009

vacated: 

2011

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

direct follow-up/precursory project(s): 

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