group

System Gallery

about: 

Artist-led volunteer-ran independent art gallery on the second floor of Bar Loco in the heart of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Proud to support early-career and emerging artists in the Northeast by offering exhibition space.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

System Gallery
22-24 Leazes Park Road
NE1 4PG Newcastle Upon Tyne 54° 58' 32.0736" N, 1° 37' 5.0052" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

established: 

2012

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

sister project(s): 

Invisible

Invisible

about: 

Through its partnership with The People’s Kitchen, the System Gallery will hand-out disposable cameras to people living in Newcastle without homes. Throughout 2017, the participants of the project are encouraged to use the cameras to document their lives and capture everyday moments. A selection of these photographs will then be developed, printed and framed to form an exhibition to be held at the System Gallery in late 2017, this exhibition will then travel throughout several venues in Newcastle.

The aim of INVISIBLE is to help people affected by homelessness to reconnect with the wider society through photography. INVISIBLE seeks to make their lives visible, only shown from their own point of view.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

System Gallery
Leazes Park Terrace
NE1 4PG Newcastle Upon Tyne 54° 58' 32.0736" N, 1° 37' 5.0052" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

established: 

2017

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

Centrum

about: 

Centrum is a contemporary art space in the Flughafenkiez district of Neukölln, Berlin. Formerly used as a retail store and brothel, Centrum’s exhibition space is not a pure white cube, but owes its specific character to its tiled floor composed of red ceramic and gray stone tiles, and from the large shop window looking out into the street. Artists have in the past on several occasions produced works and installations that were inspired by these characteristics and by the history of the space.
Centrum since 2009 has collaborated with various artists and has developed a series of experimental projects, including a festival of video installations and film screenings, and performances. Some projects were shown outside the exhibition space and in collaboration with other artist-run initiatives.
Centrum offers a platform for the discourses in and around contemporary art as well as the opportunity to meet other artists through artist talks, lectures, and film screenings.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

Situated in the so-called 'Flughafenkiez' (airport neighbourhood), in walking distance to Berlin's former airport Tempelhofer Feld, the space was formerly used as a dog shelter, café, and finally, until 2009, as a bar and brothel. In 2009 the space was refurbished and a large shop window towards the street was installed by Centrum's founding directors, Kate Squires and David Moynihan, before the exhibition space officially opened in 2010.

address: 

Centrum
Reuterstrasse 7
12053 Berlin 52° 28' 55.308" N, 13° 25' 45.984" E
DE

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2009

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

RUN

about: 

RUN was a non-for-profit curatorial collective based in London, UK. RUN was initially established as a peripatetic project space in Berlin, Germany in 2006. From January 2007 until July 2008 RUN occupied a permanent location on Tudor Grove, Hackney, London.

Central to our mission was the development of projects that fostered partnerships between established and emerging practitioners across disciplines within the wider cultural landscape. RUN strived to facilitate collaboration by operating within a non-hierarchal framework that endeavoured to promote debate, innovation, sharing of information and experience for all involved. RUN projects encompassed different formats such as lectures, publications and record releases in a move to engage with a larger and more diverse audience.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • unincorporated organisation

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

RUN
24 Tudor Grove
E9 7QL London 51° 32' 20.5332" N, 0° 3' 14.958" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

established: 

2006

vacated: 

2009

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

Plan 9

about: 

Plan 9 was an contemporary art initiative run by artists, curators and writers between 2005 to 2010.

Plan 9 members have included Chris Barr, Kayle Brandon, Rachel Butcher, Rob Chavasse, Nim-Jo Chung, Julian Claxton, Rachel Connelly, Karen Di Franco, Anton Goldenstein, Mark Harris, Toby Huddlestone, Tom Johnson, Ali Jones, John Lawrence, Julie MacCalden, Natasha MacVoy, Sophie Mellor, Anouk Mercier, Sarah Tulloch, Lucie Red and Zoe Williams.

History

Plan 9 was established in 2004 by Sophie Mellor and Julian Claxton, with Toby Huddlestone joining in March 2005. Taking advantage of the redevelopment of Bristol's city centre, Plan 9's first site was in an empty shop unit in Broadmead - the city's shopping precinct. With the support of Bristol City Council, Broadmead Alliance and the estate agents Hartnell, Taylor and Cook, Plan 9 secured the unit for a period of one year, rent free.

Plan 9's programme was formulated to support the careers of emerging artists and curators, with four main exhibitions curated by Plan 9 (Industry & Idleness, Gatsobyter, Generation Games and BRSLAXVAA). An open call was also sent out nationally, which resulted in another five exhibitions/events being curated/organised by artists and curators outside Plan 9.

In 2006, Plan 9 organised 'Wig Wam Bam!' as part of the British Art Show 6 in Bristol. Interested in working within a building already open to the public, Plan 9 formed a partnership with The Red Lodge, an Elizabethan house run the Bristol City Council Museums and Art Galleries as an example of a period home. The Red Lodge is owned (and leased to the city council) by The Bristol Savages, an all male artists' group started in 1904 and modeled along the lines of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. They still hold weekly meetings and an annual exhibition in the 'Wig Wam' - and outbuilding in the grounds of The Red Lodge.

Plan 9 invited British Art Show 6 artists Claire Barclay and Marcus Coates, and the president of the Bristol Savages, Geoff Molyneux to form the selection panel for 'Wig Wam Bam!'. Fourteen Bristol based artists were selected on the basis of both proposals for new work in relation to the site and existing work. Claire Barclay and Marcus Coates also attended a series of studio visits with the selected artists, furthering the links between the British Art Show 6 and providing an opportunity for discussion around the proposed work and the site.

At the end of 2006, Plan 9 invited Karen Di Franco to join the core group. In 2007, Plan 9 expanded the group inviting Chris Barr, Kayle Brandon, Nim-Jo Chung, Rachel Connelly, Anton Goldenstein, Julie McCalden, Tom Johnson, Ali Jones, John Lawrence and Sarah Tulloch to join. Taking on a unit at the back of Spike Island - Plan 9 presented one event (All our Worst Work) and two exhibitions (Utstallruum, and, Martin Kippenburger with fries and a shake) curated by Plan 9 members.

In 2008, working with Bristol City Council, Artspace Lifespace and Urban Splash, Plan 9 took on new premises - a former police station in Bristol's city centre, Bridewell Island - creating a gallery, project space and studios. In 2008/09 Plan 9's membership changed around again and comprised of Chris Barr, Rachel Butcher, Rob Chavasse, Nim-Jo Chung, Karen Di Franco, Anton Goldenstein, Mark Harris, Toby Huddlestone, Tom Johnson, Ali Jones, Natasha MacVoy, Sophie Mellor, Anouk Mercier, Lucie Red and Zoe Williams. During 2008 and 2009, Plan 9 ran a programme of exhibitions, events and international residencies initiated by Plan 9 members.

In November 2009, Plan 9 moved out of Bridewell Island and ceased its activities.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • unincorporated organisation

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

The Old Police Station, Bridewell Island
Nelson St
BS1 2LE Bristol 51° 27' 23.8068" N, 2° 35' 32.6112" W
GB

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • open plan, private

established: 

2005

vacated: 

2010

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

AirSpace Gallery

about: 

AirSpace Gallery is a collaborative, artist led project in Stoke-on-Trent, providing professional development opportunities, studio and exhibiting space and support for artists. Through a dynamic and evolving programme of exhibitions, events and activities AirSpace Gallery brings critical, high quality contemporary art to the region and provides opportunities for a broad range of artists.

AirSpace Gallery was formed in 2006 by two Staffordshire University fine art undergraduates, David Bethell and Andrew Branscombe. At this point there was no contemporary visual arts provision in Stoke-on-Trent. Since then AirSpace Gallery has remained artist-led and has been programming high quality visual arts activity for and from established and emerging, national and international artists, consisting of exhibitions, residencies and public realm works ,alongside a committed approach to professional artist development.

As an artist-led space, the Gallery's current research interests mirror those of its directors and is particularly concerned with issues surrounding collaboration and partnership working and a relational relevance with its location and the socio-political landscape.

AirSpace has an ongoing series of projects, which are developed through a mixture of open calls and invitation. This makes for an exciting and vibrant mix of exhibitions, residencies, projects, artist development events and public realm works.

AirSpace Gallery has always been and remains committed to Paying Artists.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • unincorporated organisation

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

Built originally as the headquarters of the City's Gas Board in 1874, 4 Broad Street has subsequently, variously, been a bank, a building society,a tax office, a mission of catholic wives suffering domestic abuse and a pensioner's charity.

address: 

AirSpace Gallery
4 Broad street
ST1 4HL Stoke-on-Trent 53° 1' 24.9816" N, 2° 10' 42.2436" W
GB

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of workshops: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

types of workshops: 

established: 

2006

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

The NewBridge Project

about: 

The NewBridge Project supports artists to investigate and challenge the boundaries of contemporary art practice.
The NewBridge Project is an artist-led community comprising of over 80 artist studios, an exhibition space and book shop based in a 29,000sqft former office block in Newcastle city centre.
The NewBridge Project was established in 2010 to provide exchange and support in an engaged and discursive community of artists. The shared workspace is a critical and collaborative environment that allows artists to discuss and develop new ideas and projects.
The NewBridge Project Space provides artists with the opportunity to exhibit in a supportive space that promotes an experimental and critical approach to practice. The exhibition space is dedicated to exploring new and diverse contemporary art practice through a programme of regular exhibitions, screenings and events, supported by responsive talks, publications and broadcasts.
The NewBridge Project continues to develop in response to the needs and interests of its members.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • community interest company

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

Norham House
12-18 New Bridge Street West
NE1 8AW Newcastle upon Tyne , TWR 54° 58' 27.7932" N, 1° 36' 38.7072" W
GB

total size in sqm/sqft: 

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of workshops: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • open plan, private

types of workshops: 

established: 

2010

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

Five Years

about: 

Five Years is a collaborative artists' project.

Founded in 1998, Five Years' initial aim was to set up a gallery which was artist-run and where programming would maintain a direct relationship to practice. Five Years continues to develop this aim of maintaining close links between the production and exhibition of visual art, and the discourse which informs it. In February 2007 the membership was expanded to form a loose knit collective of artists.

Rather than acting as a 'curatorial' entity, the group's members continue to develop exhibition projects based around concerns emerging from their own practices; offering these projects as frameworks within which other artists can, through participation, respond to or engage in dialogue around the concerns being discussed by the group. Through these processes, Five Years aims to create a context which fosters productive dialogue between artists and the exposure of ambitious new work.

How might an artist-run gallery, a collection, a collective, a communal project?
Such a problem became one of identification. How do we, participants in Five Years, define ourselves in relation to the space and project? How do we identify ourselves to be seen in relation to the expert discourse of the market?
The project must display within its protocol,to being named and identified in this process, to submit (even if marginally) to its form of management.
As a collection of fragments, then, Five Years approaches its own arrangement as a collection that foregrounds the justice of exteriority, a refusal of synthesis through selection, a justice of “arrangement at the level of disarray.”
A gallery in pieces (a collection of pieces, a collective based on the fragment), the inclusion in the space shows not one distilled collective concern, but a concern for collective equivocity. Such a term does not call towards ambivalence or ambiguity. Instead it points towards equal voices, towards the struggle that equality demands.
To place voices in equal is to experience not harmonic synthesis (achieved through the sublime violence of sublation) but the constancy of struggle, of the discordance of discourse among equals.

The collective whole or work of Five Years, then, is the work of the empty place around which a garland of fragments operate. As fragments (each practice a fragment) each practice is that of the ‘complete’ individual – the hedgehog or porcupine principle whereby the fragment individuates completely – but these complete parts converge as on a garland. The string upon which these fragments are strung, Five Years, encircles an ‘empty place’ as the site of incompletion, of the refusal of completion through synthesis. Here the possible activity of dissensus rather than consensus can take place, if one is brave enough.
A fleeting proposition from us: Romantic Bureaucracy is put forward, is put on hold. (To think a bureaucracy in terms of Romanticism put forward by Blanchot would be to think about an instrumentalisation of a movement that necessarily composes and decomposes, that comes together to fall apart.
So. Not Romantic Bureaucracy, then. That is happening already as an artist run space- exhibition-event form, that persistently un-works itself, refuses coherence. To borrow again from Blanchot, we perhaps have here the work of un-working.
To end for now with a question: we might ask, paradoxically, what is lacking in the fragment? Both nothing and everything – it is both irresolutely complete and incomplete. Instead we might ask how one moves from the open field of the social to the abrupt violent gesture that fragments, that causes the fracture of the fragment.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

history of the site: 

Five Years started in 40 Underwoord st, the site was an old Victorian Soap Factory. For its new location in 66 Andrews Road, we found an industrial building initially used for working only spaces.

exhibitions, events, workshops: 

2015
Associates
Delta: Oona Grimes, Mark Jackson, James Lowne, Clare Mitten, Mia Taylor
S_ _ _K:
Charlotte Knox-Williams, Russell Hart, Helen Austwick Zaltzman
Vertigo Rising: John Hughes & Liz Murray
Descriptor: Bernice Donzeilmann
Bang Your Head: Architecture of Conversation
Ilga Leimanis+Bidisha Sinha
How to Write: Reading Groups. Part 1.
The Naturalness of Strange Things: The Line That(…)
Luxury Complex: Remembering Satan
Loop-the-Loop
Steve Klee Too Prolix: Between a Rock and a Hard Place
2014
dis-kuhm-bob-yuh-leyt
five sheets at Five Years: Susan Johanknecht and Katharine Meynell
Beside: Nicole Morris, Katrin Hanusch and Mark Duffy
texts from Emily Beber, Giulia Damiani and Amy McKelvie
The School of the Damned: Interim Show
Benefit: All Research Is Crisis
Five Years & School of the Damned Discussion/Events
Ms. Seat Cello: Rochelle Fry
Summer Camp: School of Calidity/ Doggerland/ Fear + Trembling
Worlds Apart
FiveYears: Fragments at the Showroom
Michael Lawton: Jardines de Sabatini
Giorgio Sadotti: Feet Feet Feel
Oona Grimes: When is Now
Five Years Publications: Public Series. FYP-PS-01-05
These New Zines!/Ovi Novi Zinovi! With love from Belgrade
Clay Arlington in London.
Interior Domestic
Ignominious Wank

2013
A day of continual irritation for myself
Joan of Art: The Venice Process
A Promise of Happiness: 20.11.99
Technologies of Romance
Blank Stare, Flat Hollow
Five Years at Sluice Art Fair
Album2
This is Not Public/ Part 2: What do we mean by Public Engagement?
Modern Interiors
A Heap, A Pile, A Mass, A Gathering
Petrol
Ra-Ra Rasputin: The Esoteric Book Disco
General title given by myself: SE Barnet
This is Not Public/ Part 1: What do we mean by Public Engagement?
School of the Damned
Arkham Asylum: Ana María Millán
Five Years: Fragments
Besame Mucho: Alex Schady
Armada: Ian Dawson
Jamie Partridge & Lynton Talbot

2012
Five Years Publications III: A Plotted Affair; Bad Love Poetry Night
Five Years Publications II: School Book Projects
Five Years Publications I: Artists Books Weekend
Height X Width X Depth
Exercises With Five Years - (Im)Possible School Book: As Found
Beta-Local
Left Of Place
Ideas Are Faster
Light And Time
Dead Original
Five Years Talk At La Scatola
Sideshow And Other Stories
Irish Female Artists
A Pigeon, A Kitchen And An Annexe: Sites Of Alternative Publishing
Preliminary Notes For Moving Between Desert And Occupation
Cuntstone & Clown

2011
Z-Depth Buffer
Desk Space
This Is Not A School
House In The Shape Of A Stretcher
Instantly Interruptible
00:00:00.
Picture Theory
Cream Guillotine
The Weaklings
Posters Fo’ Sho'
Ladies Of The Press* presents…
Evolution Of The Meringue
Closer Encounters Of The Third Kind
Re Infecta
Flying Stickers
Slipstream

2010
So Much For Free School, Etc: A Draft Publication
Album: A Group Show
Photographs: From The Particular To The Particular
What I Thought At The Time
Fairyland
Omnicasus
Good Tidings
The Muttering Cavern Of Domestic Delights
Whatever Happened
Lecture Hall. Free School.
Indirections_1
Commonism
By Day My Limbs, By Night My Mind
Harry Pye Presents
Bakkar Island
Field Recordingsinter Rites
Love Is A Highway

2009
Extinct
Spacious
Bronzed
Interrupted Correspondence/Vice Versa: Five Years Fragments
Noble Intent
Sontag Montag
Statement
Nature Morte
Andrea Zapp
Ania Seraphin
Free Association
Ailleurs
Yes. Yes. I Know. Free School. I Know.
Line And Light
Skinner’s Room
Does God Live In The No-Fly Zone
That Was A Good Day
Perch

2008
A4 Editions
False Friends
Structures Found Structures Lost
Maskwork
In The Path Of The Most Frightening Storm, And Suffered Terrible Devastation. It Also Shows
Talent Show
Garden Of The Sleep Of Love
Periodical Vol.1 (No.1-4)
Free Show.
Paper
Spitting Distance
Glitch
I Don’t Think I Can Fit It In
Rules To Hold Onto…
Porridge Wogs

2007
Three Studies: Pee Wee. Meat. Billy.
Present State
Model As You Would Carve
Crisis And Finance And Nudes
Peroiodical Vol.1, No.1.
DY-66
Peer Esteem
O
Hotshots
Now And Then
Our Period.
Untitled Sequence 1998-2007
Romantic Anti-Humanism
Paintings And Sculptures
Il Cittadino
Rochelle Fry
Visitors
You First
Huis Clos
Psychogeometry V
There Is No Future For Us Now
Art For Everyone
Goo Goo Muck

2006
Frenzy: L’art Décoratif D’aujourd Hui (at Metropole Galleries, Folkestone)

2003
Spacemen (MOT)
Club Esther
Suicide Is Painful

2002
Xmas/ There Is Plenty of Sunshine in Summer/ Silence and Darkness/ Tender Prey/ Independent State-Estado Independiente_Stoned Chicks_Sexperimental Weekenders Ticklish CINEMATHEQUE/ Crack Whore/ Manual: Christoph Girardet and Matthias Müller/ Esther Planas/ The Way Things Are Not/ Fata Morgana/ Graham Dolphin/ Edward Dorrian: Paints a Picture/ CULPTR/ Richard Crow/ Eat Quicksilver Shit Quicksand/ Or Not

2001
The Difference Between You & Us/ I’m Wary/ Contemporary Fairy Tales/ Peter Lloyd Lewis/ Dead-wall Reverie/ Sex Abroad/ Michelle Deignan/ Drop-out/ Issed/ Manual/ Self-service_ Painting/ Sinisa Savic/ Ticklish/

2000
Starring/ The Guests protected their ankles with cardboard boxes/ Richard Crow/ The Red Room/ Rank Cheeseboard/ Failure/ Jeremy Deadman/ Denise Hawrysio/ Sara Woodfine/ Jeremy Akerman/ Self-Service/ Sleight of Hand/ Mathew Luck Galpin/ Susan Morris/ Dark Pop

1999
Taking in the Air/ A Promise of Happiness/ Marion Kalmus and Naomi Salaman/ Corporate Actions/ The Blood Show/ A Thousand Moonlit Kisses/ Own Time/ Now Look Where I Am/ Lapsus/ What is Love?

1998
Silent Movies/ What is a Photograph?

additional information: 

Awarded Charity Status (NO. 1151017)

bibliography: 

Five Years: Fragments
ISBN 978-1-903724-09-5
Francis Summers,Sally Morfill and Karen Wood, Marc Hulson and Paul Curran, Rochelle Fry with Squares and Triangles, Esther Planas with Tuesday-029, Edward Dorrian and Amy Todman
Utopographies:
Evaluation, Consensus and Location
Experts From Beyond (A Script).
FYP-PS-06
ISBN 978-1-903724-16-3

This is not Public.
FYP-PS-05
ISBN 978-1-903724-11-8
Christine Sullivan and Rob Flint, Jonathan Trayner, Charlotte Knox-Williams, Neil Ferguson, Sheila Buckley, Karen Turner, Wendy Scott and Sassa Nikolakouli, Andrew Cooper, Kim Wan, Edward Dorrian, John Greene, Joe Duggan

Ignominious Wank.
FYP-PS-04
ISBN 978-1-903724-12-5
Nicola Harlow, Trish Bould, Amy Todman, Susan Wood, Kathy Oldridge, Melanie Rose, Charlotte Knox-Williams and Edward Dorrian

(Im)Possible School Book. As Found.
FYP-PS-03
ISBN 978-1-903724-010-1
Ace&Lion (Sharon Bennett, Metod Blejec & Scott Schwager); Alain Ayers; Amateurist Network; Anna Lucas; Anna Mortimer; Annie Davey; Bella Kerr; Calum F Kerr; Catalog; Charlotte Knox-Williams & Jennifer Jarman; Chiara Mu; Collaborative Art (Froso Papadimitriou & Jonathan Bradbury); Dagmar I Glausmitzer-Smith; Damien O’connell & John Greene; Deborah Ridley; Edward Dorrian; Eitan Buchalter; Esther Planas; Esther Windsor; Francesca Cho; Gary Kempston; Hadas Kedar; Ilene Berman; James Hutchinson; J. Dunseath; Jessica Potter; Jillian Knipe; Jonathan Trayner; Julia Moore; Kim Wan; Lee Campbell; Leslie Barson; Matthew Lee Knowles; Mirja Koponen; Neil Ferguson; Patrick Loan; Rachel Cattle; SE Barnet; Sharon Gal; Simon Wells & Max Mosscrop; Steve Richards; Sylvie Vandenhoucke & Kris Van Dessel; Tansy Spinks; Teachers Consult 2012 (Joanna Wilkinson, Kate Jackson, Amy Mckelvie, Linda Scott & Effie Coe); Tom Estes; Walter Van Rÿn

This Is Not a School. Book.
FYP-PS-02
ISBN 978-1-903724-07-1
Alexander Costello, Mark Harvey, Lee Campbell, Duncan McAfee, Mike Chavez-Dawson, Alex Baker, Mike Ryder and Sarah Bowker-Jones; Lucy Cash and Theron Schmidt; Steven Eastwood & Anya Lewin; Kevin Molin & Zoe Olaru; Dagmar I Glausnitzer-Smith and Francesca Cho; Gary Kempston; Sharon Gal, Frances Morgan, Andie Brown, Sophie Cooper, Suke Driver and Aurelia McGlynn-Richon; Free School & Communist Gallery;Deborah Ridley; Patrick Loan; Chloe Cooper, Phoebe Davies & Louisa Martin; Heidi Wigmore & Sarah Buckle; Ana Cavic, Renée O’Drobinak (Ladies of the Press*; Ella Clocksin, Stephen Davies, Nicola Harlow, Ben Jenkins, Charlotte Knox-Williams, Kathy Oldridge, David Podger, Amy Todman, Marius Von Brasch; Esther Windsor; Pier Vegner Tosta; CATALOG; Amateurist Network; Charlotte Knox-Williams & Jennifer Jarman, Amy Todman, Melanie Rose; Damien O’Connell & John Greene; Naoise McGeer, Alfonso Areses; Alice Bradshaw; Annie Davey; Critical Practice; Steve Richards; Rachel Cattle; Paul Tarragó; Leslie Barson; Neil Ferguson; David Berridge; Jillian Knipe; Christine Sullivan & Rob Flint; Kim Wan; Calum F. Kerr; Jessie Bond & Elizabeth Graham

So Much For Free School, Etc.
FYP-PS-01
ISBN 978-1-903724-05-7
Alex Schady, Alice Cooper, Antje Hildebrandt, Avaes Mohammad, Bryony Kate Gillard, Carly Juneau, Charlotte Knox-Williams, Christine Sullivan & Rob Flint, David Berridge, Karen Di Franco/Concrete Radio, Marit Muenzberg, Tamarin Norwood, Mary Paterson, Edward Dorrian, Elliott Harris (Neva Elliott & Lynn Harris) Fay Nicolson & Charles Ogilvie, Francis Summers, Froso Papadimitriou, Geopolyphonies Collective Hamja Ahsan, Johanna Linsley, Jonathan Trayner (Free School), Kate Wiggs & Joanna Austin, Kathryn Faulkner, Ladies Of The Press* (Ana Cavic & Rénee O’Drobinak), Larry Achiampong, Ben Youngman, Roi Driscoll, Tefltastic: Lee Campbell Plus Guests: Phil Harris, Adrian Lee, Patrick Loan, Heidi Wigmore, Leslie Safran: The Otherwise Club, Luke Williams, Matthew Mackisack, Michael Schuller, Neil Ferguson, Nela Milic, Nicolas Vass, Oliver Guy-Watkins, Patricia Vidal Delgado, Patrick Loan, Paul Tarragó, Pier Vegner Tosta, Rachel Cattle, Rebecca Birch, Sandra Erbacher, Seth Guy, Steve Richards Tele-Geto: John Cussans, Vasileios Kantas & Jo Bradshaw

ISBN 978-1-903724-00-2
Failure/ Rank Cheeseboard
Paul Whittaker, Edward Dorrian/ Fergal Stapleton, Neil Ferguson

ISBN 978-1-903724-01-9
False Friends
Clive Hodgson, Susan Morris

ISBN 978-1-903724-02-6
Whatever Happened
Dierdre O’Dwyer

ISBN 978-1-903724-03-3
Sontag Montag:
Drawings,recordings and diagrams by Susan Morris
with essays by Ed Krcma, Margaret Iversen and Briony Fer edited by Deirdre O’Dwyer

ISBN 978-1-903724-04-0
Sandnes Sangen
Louisa Minkin

The Blood Show
Liz Arnold, Kathe Burkhart, David Burrows, Mark Harris, Peter Lloyd Lewis, Markus Muntean & Adi Rosenblum, Henry Rogers. Edited by Peter Lloyd Lewis

Tender Prey
Francesco Clemente, Michael Curran, Marriette Renssen, Esther Planas, Alex Schady, Marc Hulson, Gillian Carnegie, Arno Nollen, Paul De Reus, Cathy de Monchaux, Pierre Klossowski, Tariq Alvi, Nick Cave, Bea Stienstra, Paul Kooiker, David Haines, Thom Puckey, Roma Pas, Stefan Banz, Susan Morris, Reinjelle Tjerpstra, Baz Meerman

Dark Star Vols 1-4
Esther Planas

Frenzy- L’Art D’Art Décoratif D’Aujourd’Hui
Fiona Curran, Mark R Taylor, Esther Planas, Mike Watson, Charlotte Bonham-Carter, Susan Morris

Five Years Periodical Vols 1-5
Various

Structures Found, Structures Lost Videos By
Paul B Davis, Steve Klee, Abbe Leigh Fletcher

Porridge Wogs
Rabiya Choudry, Andrew Gilbert, Astrid Sourkova

Talent Show
Patricia Ellis

Experimental Light in the Death Cult
Michael Salerno

Underwood
Various

Welcome to the Secret Lands and Secret Worlds
-

El Diablo en la Pintura
-

Dahmer Daily Digest
-

Untitled Sequence
Marc Hulson

Now Look Where I am: Failure, Time, Aporia
Paul Whittaker, Edward Dorrian

Bounty feeds Desert, Desert exhausts Bounty
Louisa Minkin

address: 

66 Regents Studios, Andrews Road
E8 4QN London 51° 32' 7.8" N, 0° 3' 36.8748" W
GB

usage: 

previous usage of the site: 

number of studios: 

number of exhibition/project spaces: 

types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

1998

last known status of the project: 

last known status of the site: 

David Dale Gallery

Exterior view - David Dale Gallery

about: 

David Dale Gallery and Studios is a non-profit contemporary art space based in the east end of Glasgow.

Established in 2009, David Dale Gallery and Studios promotes pioneering contemporary visual art through the commissioning and year round programming of new work and projects by early career international and UK based artists. Maintaining a commitment to providing opportunities and supporting the development of artists, curators and writers, David Dale Gallery and Studios intend to encourage professional development, education and community participation whilst delivering our core aim of presenting outstanding contemporary visual art. Additionally, the organisation operates an affordable artist studios facility, for the production and development of new work by emerging artists.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • charity

how is/was it funded ?: 

address: 

David Dale Gallery
161 Broad Street
G40 2QR Glasgow 55° 51' 3.906" N, 4° 13' 18.876" W
GB

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types of studios: 

  • private

established: 

2009

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Islington Mill

about: 

Islington Mill is a leading independent UK arts organisation based in Salford, in the NW England. Structured around an organic network of independent artists, Islington Mill runs innovative inter-disciplinary public arts programmes and artist residencies alongside studio spaces and an artists’ B&B. Drawing on the radical and subversive creative energy running through its arts activities, Islington Mill also has a reputation for putting on legendary experimental gatherings, events and parties.

Based in the evocative buildings and courtyard of a former Victorian mill, Islington Mill is a unique and inspiring environment where the architecture of industrial Britain is fused with the creative energy of industrious artists at work and at play.

Founded by Bill Campbell in 2000, who bought it after spending four years developing the project and raising the initial finance, Islington Mill is the product of a singular dream to form a network of artists around the shared goal of living and working as freely and creatively as possible.

Like the Hacienda before it, Islington Mill is organised along similar principles inspired by the Situationist movement, an avant-garde European art movement formed in the fifties and sixties that became a prototype of punk. Picking up where the former left off, Islington Mill has a similar focus of creating an open-source environment outside of conventional structures and art traditions that can act as a catalyst for “the creative act” in all its many forms and unlock the inner artist in almost anyone.

Currently run by designer Bill Campbell, musician Mark Carlin and visual artist Maurice Carlin, Islington Mill is a non-hierarchical organisation that makes no distinction between work and play, outcome and process, chaos and control. Operating outside a commercial, profit-led agenda, it is a genuinely independent arts organisation that puts nurturing, supporting and inspiring creativity, especially new and emerging talent, at the heart of everything it does.

Forged in the spirit of D-I-Y, it recognises risk-taking and experimentalism in a non-judgmental, non-pressured environment as integral to art practice and is able to offer artists an unusual level of creative freedom in an increasingly market-led cultural landscape.

Although Islington Mill is predominantly focussed around the physical space in Salford, it recently organised its first “mass residency” with thirty artists in Ibiza and now plans to take the spirit of Islington Mill on tour elsewhere, building on existing links starting this October with an exchange with Flux Factory NYC.

Not content with stopping at these achievements, Islington Mill is continuously seeking to progress in its mission to inspire, educate and develop artists in their careers in an ever-changing social and cultural landscape.

Islington Mill was very pleased to have recieved its first ever ACE programme funding in the history of its organisation earlier in 2013, which will be used towards testing new strategies for residencies and developing its marketing and organisational structure.

As part of this forward-looking strategy, Islington Mill is excited about the opportunity to develop it's 6th floor space into further B&B style bedrooms and its 5th floor space into a dedicated artist residency space.

However further funding is still needed for Islington Mill to realise its full potential and so it is constantly exploring funding sources and income streams that will allow it to maintain its unique vision for the arts into the future.

To this end, Islington Mill has also secured Arts Council Catalyst funding, in consortium with the Chinese Arts Centre, this fund helps arts organisations access private funding by exploring how relationships can be formed with patrons and other independent sources.

Islington Mill is now to an exciting future that is global and ambitious. With the right funding in place, it hopes to be responsible for sending local artists out onto international residencies, while receiving incoming international artists in order to realise its full potential as a dynamic international arts hub and creative interchange.

how is/was it run/structured ?: 

what is/was it's legal status ?: 

  • other

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address: 

James Street
M3 5HW Salford 53° 28' 54.9156" N, 2° 15' 47.412" W
GB

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established: 

2000

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last known status of the site: 

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